green home designs -Green Home TV – IKEA – Sustainable Design for the Whole Home

January 18, 2014 – 12:21 am

** Http :/ / www.greenhometv.org – IKEA has products and solutions to make great interior design more sustainable and affordable. Christy Bremer, Green Home In TV …

Steven Schwen ** path to ground Organic Farm (Lake City, Minnesota) has built an innovative greenhouse that allows him to extend the growing season, while reducing … Video Rating: 4 / 5

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  1. 25 Responses to “green home designs -Green Home TV – IKEA – Sustainable Design for the Whole Home”

  2. Wow. Some ideas I can build upon to suit my environment, but to a lesser
    degree. This model you presented is the ultimate.

    By Robert Capecchi on Jan 18, 2014

  3. Your comet about measuring profits, you said maybe its a 60s thing, but I
    think your wrong about that conclusion. Don’t credit it to the 60s, give
    credit to where credit is deserved witch is to a very very wise man!

    By eyeofasoul on Jan 18, 2014

  4. 

    By Transterraform on Jan 18, 2014

  5. THis is a great idea & video , Thanks for sharing .

    By suziamazon on Jan 18, 2014

  6. Namaste.

    By DeSwiss on Jan 18, 2014

  7. Nice ideas but not very practical for the general grower with a greenhouse.

    By andrew hodgkinson on Jan 18, 2014

  8. Félicitation, le solaire est une énergie bienfaisante et d’avenir! En
    conviendrons-nous enfin? même en agriculture …

    By Jean Jacques Flosse on Jan 18, 2014

  9. Nicely produced video account of a key farm-tech systems upgrade for the
    temperate climes. Crowdfundable? Barn-raisable? You betcha. More on the
    design principles at:

    http://www.sunnyjohn.com/indexpages/shcs.htm

    By Benjamin Brownell on Jan 18, 2014

  10. thank you for posting,when i get done i would like more info,thanks God
    bless

    By 13ou812 on Jan 18, 2014

  11. very cool concept. i like it, but there is one problem. the government may
    decide that this contributes to global warming and decide to tax the hell
    out of your profits.. afterall, you are warming land that is naturally
    suppose to be cold, so you are deemed a criminal to the planet…and
    therefore, you must pay for sins… just kidding… channel heat to power
    your home… and not just grow crops in the winter..

    By huffandpoot on Jan 18, 2014

  12. the government borrows every last cent it loans out from banks at interest
    calibrated loans, the fact you think it comes out of the publics pocket
    proves you should stick with agriculture and leave economics to those who
    actually have a clue how it works.

    By spiritparaclete on Jan 18, 2014

  13. Why did I thumb down? It wasn’t because what he did wasn’t awesome, it
    certainly was. He has an awesome place and will probably sustain him and
    his family for decades. Great. Now what about the tax dollars the
    government had to steal to Paul to pay this this guy ‘Peter’? This is the
    problem with people who mistaking believe the government has money and
    should help with programs like this. The government doesn’t have not ONE
    PENNY! For every penny it gives out it had to steal 3-4 from a tax payer

    By Tru Tube on Jan 18, 2014

  14. Awesome. Thought about running the chimney like that too or build a rocket
    stove in the greenhouse. I’m already seeing over 6c difference with less
    than half of the windows installed and only half of the installation
    installed. Are you building with rammed tires and timber?

    By trybal007 on Jan 18, 2014

  15. @cookingupastory i wish i could be a story! lol

    By theproducegarden on Jan 18, 2014

  16. @theproducegarden thank you!

    By Cooking Up a Story on Jan 18, 2014

  17. I am against any idea that relies upon the grid and a large investment. And
    anything that isn’t 100% practical has an efficiency problem. All
    greenhouses should be underground. It makes perfect sense. Whether its
    aquaponics or whatever. Without using the Earth’s built in thermal energy,
    it requires more money spent on more materials. And it sure as hell is hard
    to stabilize a climate above ground without using some type of man-made
    energy. Not required underground.

    By highnote606 on Jan 18, 2014

  18. Me speak no fizicks!

    By twodeadpoets on Jan 18, 2014

  19. thankyou…….. a true earth scientist…

    By byronsowntime on Jan 18, 2014

  20. thanks for sharing!

    By Eszter Bódi on Jan 18, 2014

  21. Awesome

    By al boo boo on Jan 18, 2014

  22. Is this “banking” as is First National Bank or “banking” as in riverbank ?
    I would think it would make more sense to have an air to water heat
    exchanger and them pump water under the floor … like radiant heat, or
    even have black tubes running in the greenhouse roof to pick up heat and
    then pump it underground, or just create a hot water reservoir and use it
    to heat the greenhouse floor. You get the economy of scale, and you could
    heat your house too.

    By justgivemethetruth on Jan 18, 2014

  23. dude contradicts himself..says he grows tomatos and peppers started in
    February harvesting in May, but then says he has frost inside the
    greenhouse so in winter they grow salad greens????? Last time i checked
    Minnesota winters are in February??

    By CheapEnergyIdeas on Jan 18, 2014

  24. Blueprints of this greenhouse refered in video:
    sare.org/publications/fromthefield/schwendiagrams.pdf

    By tigra on Jan 18, 2014

  25. u do it, thats how.. u

    By landotheaverage on Jan 18, 2014

  26. Interesting idea. Whenever the air temp is higher by some marginal
    temperature run the fan … the sun shining should not have anything to do
    with it. Seems like it might be better to have a solar hot water heater
    arrangement and heat a slab of concrete or tanks of water. Moving air
    around is energy intensive, and there is not a lot of heat capacity in the
    air, and then trying to warm the whole ground is interesting. This reminds
    me a little of the EarthBox idea, but with air.

    By justgivemethetruth on Jan 18, 2014

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